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Full text of "Further Sources Of Vijayanagara History"

166
to impart lustre to the body and keep it uuder control "without
showing negligence in examining (it* diseases).                (t7-b)
It is desirable that u king should give audience to saukha-
ijHyanikcis*, physicians and Brahman astrologers early in the
morning; after (the first1, y&wa he should be in the company
of his ministers and nobles as well as the accountants
(kayastkas) who are employed to acquire wealth; he should
spend the midday in the company 02 niassugars, wrestlers
cooks and hunters ; and in the aparahnafi having oSered wor-
ship to the household gods, he should converse with elders,
judicial officers, and ascetics ; after dinner he should talk with
the jester and listen to the pauranwas and the poets ; he
should give audience to the spies and the musicians during the
evening; and he should enjoy the company of his queen at
night, and then go to sleep.                                                 (68)
Viewed from the standpoint of the king, (his) servants
always fall into three classes, rzz., friends (hitulu), friends and
enemies by turns \hitakiiiilu) and constant enemies (sadahitulu),
I shall describe them (to you) 0 ! Sinless one, listen!         (69)
Physicians, astrologers, learned men. poets, and purohits
are friends *, the people employed (by the king) for the collec-
tion of revenue and discharging other duties are both friends
and enemies (according to circumstances); and the people
who are desirous of getting back the wealth confiscated by the
king (by way of punishment) are ^his) perpetual enemies.
Therefore, it is only right that the king should skilfully conduct
himself towards them according to their disposition.           (70)
Having carefully observed a worthy person, it is desirable
that (a king) should, without being asked or told, astonish him
by offering him (gifts) like the appearance of the fruits of a
jack tree,? and (wealth) in a dream.                                    (71)
* Saitkfr&fSyattiAa* are people -wfco ask one r   '* Have you slept happily 1
f AparaJtna is the time between 12 noon and 3 p.m.
J The poet here allude* probably to a specie of a jack tree called  Wt&atit W&ich
bears fruits in tt» roots.   The fruits emerge out of the ground suddenly, when tier are